Research - Breast Milk Contains Gliadin (Gluten)

I've found only a few studies on this, but this is the latest one I could find on Pubmed and it discusses the subject as if it's well known already.  I find it interesting because other researchers are doing work to try and reduce the rate of childhood Celiac disease by finding the correct timing for introduction of gluten to babies.  Finding the "right time" to introduce gluten is moot if the mother's breast milk already contains gliadin, and the child is breast fed. 

Presence of high levels of non-degraded gliadin in breast milk from healthy mothers.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9867098 
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1998 Nov;33(11):1186-92.
Chirdo FG1, Rumbo M, Añón MC, Fossati CA.
Author information  -  Center for the Investigation and Development of Cryotechnology of Foods, Dept. of Immunology, School of Exact Sciences, UNLP, La Plata, Argentina.

Excerpt:
CONCLUSIONS:  Very high levels of gliadin were detected in milk samples from healthy mothers on an unrestricted diet. Gliadin levels were higher than those reported for dietary antigens in other studies. Breast milk contained non-degraded gliadins and gliadin/anti-gliadin IgA immune complexes.
Some definitions for this article:

Colostrum - the first type of milk that mothers produce, it contains more immune programming molecules than later breast milk, it converts to regular milk in about two weeks.

Gliadin - along with glutenin, is found in the proteins of wheat plants, it is the more toxic component of wheat proteins with relation to causing the immune response that leads to Celiac disease.

Antigen - a protective immune molecule, it forms immune complexes when it attaches to the object of the immune reaction, in this case, when it attaches to gliadin.

An older article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3300148
Non scientific article about this:  https://www.glutenfreesociety.org/gluten-proteins-pass-into-mothers-milk/ 

There's enough evidence that it's worth discussing it with your doctor if you're about to be a mother.


Disclaimer: I am not a doctor or a scientist.  I'm a blogger.  If you have health questions, you should consider all sources of information, including your doctor, and you shouldn't change things unless you have good reasons to do so. 

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